Why Don't Christian Conservatives Worry About Climate Change? God.

This massive chunk of free-floating sea ice is about 100 ft. thick from waterline to top—or roughly the height of a 10-story building. Courtesy of Time.

This massive chunk of free-floating sea ice is about 100 ft. thick from waterline to top—or roughly the height of a 10-story building. Courtesy of Time.

(The Washington Post) The United States will withdraw from the Paris agreement on climate change, President Trump announced Thursday. Environmental scientists say the consequences could be catastrophic for the planet. But for some Trump supporters, there’s no reason to worry.

“As a Christian, I believe that there is a creator in God who is much bigger than us,” Rep. Tim Walberg (R-Mich.) told constituents last week at a town hall in Coldwater, Mich. “And I’m confident that, if there’s a real problem, he can take care of it.”

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Our Thoughts: As the article shows, the notion that we don't need to care about climate change because "God will take care of it" is highly misguided. It is not just self-evidently bad thinking; it is also out of line with a correct view of Christian social responsibility. Christianity teaches not that we should "let go and let God" when it comes to social issues, but rather that we are to "trust God and get going." That is, we need to recognize that God works through our efforts, and calls us to take those efforts, rather than thinking that he is more "at work" if we passively do nothing. 

The best basis on which to appeal to Christians to care about climate change is, the article shows, "the concept of stewardship, or the idea that Christians have a duty to take care of the Earth." To this we would also add that caring for the earth is essential to caring for people, as what happens to the earth affects all of us--especially the poor.

Matt Perman